Events

2017 | 2018 | 2019

December 19, 2018

Seminar on “Comparison Study of Lung Cancer Genetics and Genomics between Chinese and European Populations”

Speaker: 

Professor Hongbing SHEN

Professor in Epidemiology, School of Public Health;

President, Nanjing Medical University

Time:

12:00 nn - 1:00 pm

Venue:

Seminar Room 3, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Registrations: 

https://bit.ly/2qFOrSx

Poster:

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December 03, 2018

Seminar on “Education and Research at The Swedish Red Cross University College (SRCUC)”

Speaker: 

Dr. Monir Mazaheri

Senior Lecturer, Department of Health Sciences,

The Swedish Red Cross University College

Time:

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Venue:

Seminar Room 3, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Registrations: 

https://bit.ly/2TBJJ5y

Poster:

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November 26, 2018

"Interaction Between Culture, Environment and Health” and “High-skilled Immigration to the US from India, Immigration Policy and Its Association with Health and Well-being”

Speaker: 

Dr. Mudita Dave, Ph.D. , Associate Department Chair, Division of Health Services, and Program Chair, Master of Public Health Program, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Time:

1 pm - 2 pm

Venue:

Seminar Room 2, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Registrations: 

https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/mycuform/view.php?id=199589

November 29, 2018

JCSPHPC Taught Postgraduate Programmes Information Session - Session 1

Time:

7:00pm - 9:00pm

 

Venue:

SPH Building, PWH

Enquiries:

Email: sph_tpg@cuhk.edu.hk

Map and Transportation:

Link

Registration:  

https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=5999200

November 19, 2018

JCSPHPC Graduation Ceremony 2018

Time:

6:00pm - 9:00pm

Organizer:

JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong 

Venue:

School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

November 08, 2018

Biostatistics Seminar Series: Advances in Genetic Epidemiology - Overview of influenza surveillance in Zhejiang Province

Speaker: 
Dr. Yanjun Zhang, PhD, Director of the Institute of Microbiology, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China

 

Time:

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Venue:
Room 303, 3/F, Li Ka Shing Medical Sciences Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kon

Organizer: 
Division of Biostatistics, JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, CUHK

Registrations: 
https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=6182327

October 08, 2018

Seminar: Surrounding Residential Greenness and Birthweight

Time:

1:00pm - 2:00pm (Light lunch will be provided)

Venue:

Seminar Room 3, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker:

Dr. Kelvin Fong

Postdoctoral Associate,

Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

Abstract

Natural vegetation, or greenness, around residential areas may promote health by reducing harmful exposures, relieving stress, or promoting healthful activities. We thus hypothesize that maternal exposure to greenness during pregnancy may benefit fetal growth as indicated by newborn birthweight. This is important since lower birthweight is associated with chronic disease and mortality.

 

Satellite remote sensing measures greenness through the calculation of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Combined with geospatial data science tools, births are assigned prenatal exposures to greenness using maternal residential records. By applying regression methods, we assess the association between greenness and birthweight, adjusted for potential confounders such as maternal education.

 

With birth records in Massachusetts, USA from 2001-2012, we found a positive, non-linear relationship between greenness and continuous birthweight. Interestingly, the associations in the lower range of greenness were stronger than in the higher range. We further explored greenness associations with low birthweight (LBW; < 2,500 g) and small for gestational age (SGA; < 10th percentile of birthweight given gestational age and newborn sex). Greenness was associated with lower odds of LBW and SGA. In contrast to some prior studies, associations were stronger among those with higher socioeconomic status.

 

In summary, recent findings suggest that maternal exposure to greenness during pregnancy leads to higher birthweight. Our work also demonstrates the application of satellite imagery and modern geospatial data science tools in epidemiologic research.

 

Speaker's Biography

Dr. Kelvin Fong is currently a postdoctoral associate at Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, focusing on environmental health disparities. He recently completed his Doctor of Science in environmental epidemiology at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, where he completed his dissertation on maternal environmental exposures and birthweight. He is interested in applying geospatial data science and advanced regression methods in epidemiologic settings to understand disparities in environmental exposures and subsequent health effects.

Poster:

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Registration:

https://goo.gl/ZHicsh

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

September 26, 2018

Seminar: Resilience, Multimorbidity and Ageing

Time:

1:00pm - 2:00pm (Light lunch will be provided at 12:45pm)

Venue:

Seminar Room 3, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker:

Dr. Marjorie Johnston

Research Fellow

The Institute of Applied Health Sciences,

University of Aberdeen,

United Kingdom

Abstract:

Populations are ageing rapidly, therefore enabling individuals to age well is crucial to avoid placing an increasing burden on individuals, their carers, and health and social care services. Ageing without any adversity or decline is not realistic, however promoting resilience to lessen the impact of ageing may be a route towards a better quality of life in older age. In this seminar I will describe findings from my PhD with regards to defining and measuring resilience in the context of multimorbidity. I will go on to describe how I plan to study resilient ageing across the spectrum of age-related decline in collaboration with colleagues at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Universities of Aberdeen and Glasgow in Scotland.

Speaker:

Dr Marjorie Johnston trained in Public Health Medicine and recently completed her PhD at the University of Aberdeen. Her PhD investigated multimorbidity and resilience to multimorbidity. She is a Member of the Faculty of Public Health and part of the Aberdeen Centre for Health Data Science. Her current post-doctoral research at the University of Aberdeen involves studying the contribution of renal impairment to cognitive decline as well as conducting qualitative research to explore the views of older people with regards to healthy ageing. Her long-term research plans are to study resilient ageing, its trajectories, determinants and outcomes across large longitudinal cohorts.

Poster:

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Registration:

https://goo.gl/kYeXL9

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

September 20, 2018

Seminar: Patient-centred care in Multimorbidity

Time:

1:00pm - 2:00pm (Light lunch will be provided at 12:45pm)

Venue:

Seminar Room 3, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker:

Prof. Stewart Mercer

Professor of Primary Care Research

General Practice and Primary Care Unit

Institute of Health and Wellbeing

University of Glasgow

Abstract:

Researchers from the UK tested a new approach to caring for people with three or more long-term conditions which aimed to improve their health-related quality of life and experience of patient-centred care, and reduce their burden of illness and treatment compared with usual care. The  ‘3D’ approach, which encourages clinicians to think broadly about the different dimensions of health, simplify complex drug treatment and consider mental health (depression) as well as physical health, was designed to treat the whole person and overcome the disadvantages of treating individual conditions in isolation. The 3D Study was the largest RCT to date on an intervention for patients with Multimorbidity, and was published in the Lancet in April 2018. Professor Mercer, who led the Scottish arm of the trial, will report the findings and their implications.

Speaker:

Stewart Mercer is a General Practitioner and Professor of Primary Care Research in the General Practice and Primary Care unit in the Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow. He is also the current Director of the Scottish School of Primary Care and National Lead for research into multimorbidity in primary care in Scotland. He is a former Director of Quality at the Royal College of General Practitioners in Scotland. He was Visiting Professor in Primary Care and Acting Head of Department at the Chinese University of Hong Kong from 2007-2008 and remains an Adjunct Professor. Stewart is internationally recognised for his award winning research on multimorbidity, and his research on empathy in healthcare. He has published over 250 papers, including in leading journals such as the Lancet and the British Medical Journal. He has raised over £10 million in research grants.

Poster:

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Registration:

https://goo.gl/tEo2xQ

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

September 13, 2018

Seminar: From Satellites to Burden: New Approaches to Assessing the Global Burden Associated with Ambient Air Pollution

Time:

12:45pm - 1:45pm (Light refreshment will be provided at 12:30pm)

Venue:

Room 301, 3/F, Li Ka Shing Medical Sciences Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker:

Professor Gavin SHADDICK

Chair of Data Science & Statistics,

Department of Mathematics,

University of Exeter

Exeter Director,

CUHK-Exeter Centre for Environmental Sustainability and Resilience (ENSURE)

Abstract:

In May 2018, the World Health Organization released updated estimates of the number of deaths that can be attributed to fine particulate ambient air pollution. The estimate, of 4.2 million deaths per year worldwide, is based on country-level estimates of population-level exposures. The primary source of information for estimating exposures has been measurements from ground monitoring networks but, although coverage is increasing, there remain regions in which monitoring is limited. Ground monitoring data therefore needs to be supplemented with information from other sources, such as satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth and chemical transport models. A hierarchical modelling approach for integrating data from multiple sources is proposed allowing spatially-varying relationships between ground measurements and other factors that estimate air quality. Temporal trends are modelled by allowing relationships to change, smoothly, over time. Set within a Bayesian framework, the resulting Data Integration Model for Air Quality (DIMAQ) is used to estimate exposures on a high-resolution grid covering the entire world. For each grid-cell, a full posterior distribution (of exposures) is produced, allowing point estimates (e.g. means, medians), measures of uncertainty (e.g. credible intervals) and exceedance probabilities (e.g. probability of being over guidelines) to be calculated.  Bayesian analysis on this scale can be computationally challenging and here approximate Bayesian inference is performed using Integrated Nested Laplace Approximations (INLA). Estimated exposures from the model, produced on a high-resolution grid (10km x 10km) covering the entire globe, are combined with risk estimates to produce a global assessment of exposures to PM2.5 over time (2010-2016) and to estimate the associated burden of disease attributable to air pollution. We also examine regional differences in the proportion of people who reside in areas in which exposures exceed WHO guidelines. 

Speaker:

Prof Shaddick did his undergraduate degree in Maths and Statistics at the University of Warwick followed by a Master’s degree in Statistics at University College, London. He did his PhD at Imperial College in Statistics and Epidemiology. After 16 years at the University of Bath, he joined the University of Exeter in 2017 where he is Professor of Data Science and Statistics and Chair of the department of Mathematics.

He is an internationally recognised expert in the field of Bayesian spatio-temporal modelling and develops methodology for large-scale, high-resolution, modelling of air pollution, with particular attention to the propagation of uncertainty throughout the modelling process.  Publications have included methods for estimating personal exposures to environmental hazards, detecting increased risk around putative point sources of pollution, incorporating spatial modelling into studies of the effects of pollution on health and the global estimation of air quality and the associated burden on health. He is also actively engaged in research with the power industry, using big data and data reduction techniques to model demand profiles, forecasting demands and identifying customer profiles. Of particular interest are computational techniques that allow the implementation of complex statistical models to real-life applications where the scope over both space and time may be very large. He is the co-author of two books:  ‘The Oxford Handbook of Epidemiology for Clinicians’ and ‘Spatio-Temporal Modelling in Environmental Epidemiology’.

Since 2015 he has led the WHO’s Data Integration Taskforce and the development of the Data Integration Model for Air Quality (DIMAQ) which is used to produce global estimates of PM2.5 for the WHO Global Burden of Disease assessment and for the Institute of Health Metric Evaluation’s Global Burden of Disease assessments in 2016 and 2017. He is actively involved in the calculation of a number of SDG metrics related to air pollution and in 2017 he was invited to serve on the UK government’s Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants and its subgroup on the Quantification of Air Pollution Risks.

He has recently been appointed as the Exeter Director of the joint CUHK-Exeter Centre for Environmental Sustainability and Resilience (ENSURE).

Poster:

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Registration:

https://goo.gl/tEo2xQ

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

August 12, 2018

Seminar: Liver and Pancreas Cancer Epidemiology: Recent Trends, Racial Disparities and Risk Factors

Time:

1:00pm - 2:00pm 

Venue:

KCTCRC, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker:

Dr. V. Wendy Setiawan

Associate Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine,

Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California

USA

Abstract:

In this seminar, Dr. Setiawan will discuss the recent trends, racial disparities, emerging risk factors for liver and pancreatic cancer. These two cancers have been highlighted as important emerging cancer problems due to their increasing incidence and mortality rates despite most cancers now currently experiencing decreasing rates. She will present her epidemiologic studies focusing on racial/ethnic disparities in incidence and disease etiology in multiethnic diverse populations.

Poster:

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Registration:

https://goo.gl/Wy5BPm

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

June 20, 2018

Seminar: Constrained Instrument Construction in Mendelian Randomization

Time:

11:00am - 12:00nn 

Venue:

Room 303, 3/F, Li Ka Shing Medical Sciences Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker:

Prof. Celia GREENWOOD

Senior Investigator, Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital

Professor, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Abstract:

In Mendelian randomization (MR), inference about a causal relationship between a phenotype of interest and a response or disease outcome can be obtained by constructing instrumental variables from genetic variants.
However, MR inference requires several assumptions, including that the genetic variants only influence the response through the phenotype of interest. Pleiotropy, which occurs when some genetic variants affect on more than one phenotype, can invalidate these genetic variants for use as instrumental variables and a naïve analysis will give biased estimates of the causal association. Here, we present new methods (Constrained Instrumental Variable methods [CIV]) to construct valid instrumental variables and perform adjusted causal
effect estimation when pleiotropy exists but when the pleiotropic phenotypes are available. We demonstrate that a smoothed version of CIV performs approximate selection of genetic variants that are valid instruments, and provides unbiased estimates of the causal effects.

Poster:

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Registration:

https://cloud.itsc.cuhk.edu.hk/webform/view.php?id=5186765

Enquiries:

b124419@mailserv.cuhk.edu.hk

June 19, 2018

Experience Sharing Session : Bhutan – Aggravated Disaster Risk along with Development

Time:

12:00pm - 1:00pm (Light lunch will be served at 11:45pm)

Venue:

104, Y. C. Liang Hall, CUHK, Shatin

Abstract:

This sharing session will feature four Bhutanese health professionals from the Government departments and local health units. They will introduce the country facing the growing risk brought about by development. The management of health risk regarding the four disasters commonly occur in Bhutan, namely fire, earthquake, landslide and glacier lake outburst floods (GLOF) will be discussed.

Registration:

https://bit.ly/2kEsQXE

Enquiries:

rosannaso@cuhk.edu.hk

June 05, 2018

Seminar on Patients, Doctors and Complexity Management in Multimorbidity

Time:

1:00pm - 2:00pm (Light lunch will be served at 12:45pm)

Venue:

KCTCRC, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker: 

Professor Edouard Battegay

MD, FACP, ESH Specialist Hypertension, Fellow SSPH+

Professor of Medicine, Head Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract:

Between 20–30% of the population and about 90% of inpatients hospitalized in General Internal Medicine have multiple concurrent acute or chronic diseases, i.e., they are multimorbid (MM). Complexity increases overproportionally with the number of concurrent diseases, probably partially due to disease-disease interactions (DDIs)

Very typical MM clusters include vascular risk factors, heart - and pulmonary disease. Another cluster includes major mental disorders in conjunction with somatic diseases, and in the elderly frailty, falls and depression. Conditions occur sometimes in characteristic dyadic, triadic or higher combinations (pain and depression, non-adherence and depression, hypertension and pain, diabetes and high dose steroids, acutely exacerbated COPD and depression). Some of these conditions and combinations of interactions interact to worsen length of stay, morbidity and mortality as well as resource use. Thus, a newer and more restricted definition of MM emphasizes the complex interactions of several concurrent diseases.

There are only limited evidence-based guidelines for MM, even for most prevalent forms of MM and frequent interacting combinations (e.g. pain and hypertension). This leaves MM care heavily reliant upon clinical guidelines intended for the treatment of single diseases. However, these guidelines do not adequately address the combined risk to multimorbid patients and tend to ignore adverse DDI’s (disease-disease, drug-disease and drug-drug interactions, due to multiple drug regimens, i.e., polypharmacy), especially if a condition is outside the usual realm of those specialists from the same field of expertise that wrote the guidelines.

Decision-making concerning therapeutic conflicts typically demands prioritizing and reconciling adverse DDI’s with the most suitable, best acceptable and sometimes surprising therapeutic strategy. Decision-making in dilemma situations can induce psychological stress upon patients and especially on very conscientious medical doctors that they need to consciously deal with. For that matter we are setting up a virtual reality lab to train medical doctors in medically challenging situations of ambiguity.

Overall, neither health care systems, nor hospitals or medical doctors or patients are fully prepared and set up to deal with these forms of complexity yet.

Poster:

Download Poster

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

April 13, 2018

Hong Kong SciFest 2018 Public Lecture - Are We Really Leading an "Earth and Health" Friendly Lifestyle in Hong Kong?

Time:

2:00pm - 3:30pm

Venue:

Classroom, Hong Kong Science Museum, 2 Science Museum Road, Tsimshatsui East, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Speaker: 

Professor Emily Ying-Yang CHAN

Associate Director,  JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

The more frequent high-temperature days and extreme weather events caused by climate change affects our health in multiple ways, but at the same time our actions also affect the Earth’s health. This lecture discusses how climate change affects human health, and how our health can be co-benefits when we act to protect the Earth’s health.

Poster:

Download Poster

Details:

http://www.hk.science.museum/scifest2018/view_detail.php?lang=en&act_refno=89

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

March 25, 2018

Lunchtime Seminar - Bridging Cultural Borders: Conducting Research and Teaching in Diverse Contexts

Time:

1:00pm - 2:00pm

Venue:

KCTCRC, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker: 

Dr. Monir MAZAHERI

Senior Lecturer and Researcher, The Swedish Red Cross University College

Biography:

Dr Monir Mazaheri presents her cross-cultural experiences in teaching and conducting research.

Monir Mazaheri is a senior lecturer and a researcher at The Swedish Red Cross University College. Her career has included varied experiences as a clinical nurse, nurse educator and researcher.

Her main research interest lies in studying older people, their relatives and healthcare professionals in different situations including but not limited to living with dementia, living with trouble conscience and older people in disasters. She is interested in including culturally diverse population in her research studies and has a major interest in ethics.

Poster:

Download Poster

Registration:

https://goo.gl/UaPQYW

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

March 23, 2018

Taught Postgraduate Programmes (2018 Intake) Information Session

Time:

3:00pm - 5:00pm

 

Venue:

1/F, SPH Building, PWH

Enquiries:

Tel: 2252-8466

Fax: 2145-7489

Email: sph_tpg@cuhk.edu.hk

Map and Transportation:

Link

Registration:  

http://goo.gl/8DnqJC

February 28, 2018

Seminar on Meditation and Health

Time:

6:30pm - 8:30pm

Venue:

Lecture Theatre, Hong Kong Central Library, 66 Causeway Road, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong

Speaker: 

Ajahn Brahm

Abbot, Bodhinyana Monastery, Australia

 

Professor Samuel Wong

Head, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Healthcare;  and Associate Director (Undergraduate Education)

JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Poster:

Download Poster

Registration:

Click Here for Registration

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

January 11, 2018

Taught Postgraduate Programmes (2018 Intake) Information Session

Time:

7:00pm - 9:00pm

 

Venue:

1/F, SPH Building, PWH

Enquiries:

Tel: 2252-8466

Fax: 2145-7489

Email: sph_tpg@cuhk.edu.hk

Map and Transportation:

Link

Registration:  

http://goo.gl/8DnqJC

January 10, 2018

Seminar on Social Group Disparities in Esophageal Cancer

Time:

12:45pm - 1:45pm

Venue:

KCTCRC, 1/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin

Speaker: 

Dr. Shaohua Xie

Assistant Professor in Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

Abstract:

There are substantial disparities in the incidence and prognosis of esophageal cancer across social population groups, including sex, race/ethnicity, geographical location and socio-economic status. Both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus are more common in men than in women, but the male predominance in adenocarcinoma is stronger and less well understood. The varying incidence and prognosis of esophageal cancer across racial/ethnic groups show distinct patterns by histological type. Individuals residing in rural areas have a higher incidence and worse prognosis than those in urban areas in developing regions. Lower socio-economic status is associated with an increased incidence and reduced survival in esophageal cancer. Sustained research identifying novel preventive and therapeutic strategies are needed to reduce the risk of esophageal cancer and improve the prognosis in all social groups.

Poster:

Download Poster

Registration:

https://goo.gl/RDNH5T

Enquiries:

info_sphpc@cuhk.edu.hk

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