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Research: A rising trend in primary brain cancer incidence in younger males in high-income countries


Professor Martin Wong Chi-sang (left), the senior corresponding author of the study and Dr Jason Huang Junjie, first author of the study and Research Assistant Professor, both from The Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care at CU Medicine.
Professor Martin Wong Chi-sang (left), the senior corresponding author of the study and Dr Jason Huang Junjie, first author of the study and Research Assistant Professor, both from The Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care at CU Medicine.

Primary brain cancer, though not a common malignancy, has a very poor survival rate compared to other types of cancer. The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK)’s Faculty of Medicine (CU Medicine) has conducted a study with the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU) to investigate the global distribution and risk factors of and epidemiological trends in primary brain cancer.


The results showed that the incidence of primary brain cancer was higher in high-income jurisdictions, and an increase was observed in younger males in high-income countries. The incidence was closely related to the per capita gross domestic product (GDP), the human development index (HDI) and the prevalence of traumatic brain injuries, occupational carcinogen exposure and mobile phone use at the country level.


Details of the study have been published recently in the international medical journal Neuro-Oncology.


Dr Jason Huang Junjie, first author of the study and Research Assistant Professor from The Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care at CU Medicine, said, “The incidence of and mortality from primary brain cancer vary by region, which may be related to detection and diagnosis ability and the prevalence of risk factors in each place. However, the causes have not been established yet and require further investigation. Future studies should explore the reasons behind these epidemiological transitions, so that they can provide insights on causes and prevention.”

Professor Martin Wong Chi-sang, the senior corresponding author of the study, from The Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care at CU Medicine, added, “The overall incidence of primary brain cancer has been stable in recent years, but it is alarming that it is increasing among younger males and its mortality has not obviously declined.


Details: Faculty of Medicine, CUHK: https://bit.ly/3k9w9YL


Full article of the study: https://bit.ly/3ZlYkUx


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